Facebook Tracks You Even After You Log Out

Facebook has always topped the list of privacy invaders since it’s inception, however, a recent revelation has shocked security analysts and internet users alike.

According to information and proofs unveiled recently, Facebook cookies track you even after you logout, to make sure that they maintain a complete list of websites that you may visit even after logging out to build a comprehensive and sophisticated data about user behavior.

To experiment this yourself, create few fake Facebook accounts. After using them for some time, you will find that Facebook will suggest you your real account as a friend. This is a proof that Facebook knows that all accounts are coming from the same browser, even after you are logged out.

So apparently if you don’t want to be tracked then logging out of Facebook isn’t enough, you will need to clear all the browser cookies (relating to Facebook), or maintain a separate browser (other than your primary browser) to use Facebook, or don’t use Facebook at all.

Making it worse, it appears, Facebook isn’t bothered about this flaw. The guy who revealed the bug claims to have reported this to Facebook through their support and press emails, but of no avail. He says that the has all the emails that he has sent to Facebook over past one year regarding the said issue.

Just to mention, this user behavior or user tracking data is of extreme value for marketers and government agencies. They can pay anything for this data to be made available to them.

After going through the track record of Facebook, one might think that Onion’s this report of Facebook’s link with CIA was probably more than just a prank.

Advertisements

For Those Who Are Still Using Facebook‏

“We have not removed the content from Facebook, although some pages may have been removed by their creators, but have only restricted access to it from certain countries out of respect for local rules,” Facebook spokeswoman Debbie Frost wrote in an e-mail to PC World on Tuesday.

But the fact is that they still not restricted access to Blasphemous Content from Pakistan, visit below the two links

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=125882914103980&ref=search&sid=7gVlLeAgFSNLikAeB5zCsA.2384431038..1#

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Everybody-draw-Muhammad/120780407938224?ref=search&sid=eXORIR73vTzviMr_LzuBIw.1863568975..1#

If you have visit the links please delete/deactivate your facebook accounts because facebook have no respect for our beloved Prophet Mohammad (Peace be upon him)

For full story visit the following link

SOURCE:http://propakistani.pk/2010/06/01/facebook-admits-censoring-content-in-pakistan/

Facebook opens Chat to XMPP: Will Windows Live Messenger join in?


Facebook opened up Facebook Chat to 3rd party clients using the XMPP/Jabber protocol. While this is good news for users of Pidgin, which can access both Windows Live Messenger and XMPP Clients, Windows Live Messenger does not use the XMPP protocol and can not currently connect directly to Facebook Chat. So will that change? We asked for a Microsoft response, and got this:

“Windows Live participates in an industry defined by change. Consumer choice is continually expanding with new services launching almost daily. To this end, with Windows Live and Messenger, we are making it easier for consumers to integrate contacts, communications and sharing across the multitude of internet services they want to use. We’ll interoperate where it makes sense, as we’ve done with Yahoo! and customers of Office Communications Server. We’ll continue to invest in contact portability and identity standards, as we’ve done with our contacts APIs. And we’ll integrate feeds, as we’ve done with over 75 top web services in the last year. This will continue to be a major focus going forward.”

Dharmesh Mehta, director of Windows Live Product Management

Well of course to us, it “makes sense” to interoperate with Facebook (we hate having to keep the browser open during a FB chat), but Windows Live Messenger has been a notoriously closed system in the past, so we’re not sure it will make sense to Microsoft. However if it means losing customers who find themselves using Facebook Chat more and Windows Live Messenger less, that may change. We should be hearing more about the Windows Live Platform later this year, so maybe there’s hope that Facebook Chat may be part of that “major focus”.

Do you find yourself using Facebook Chat more? Let us know in the comments how important Windows Live Messenger/Facebook integration would be to you.